Education Trust News

2011 National Conference

2011 National Conference

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Report: Few California Students Ready for College, Career

Like all states, California’s prosperity rests on the strength of its workforce. Yet a new report from The Education Trust–West finds the Golden State’s high schools aren’t preparing students to participate in an economy that increasingly demands a college education. Across the five districts studied, college-readiness rates among high school graduates ranged from 24 to 60 percent. In one illustrative district, the course of study provide to about 30 percent of white high school graduates and almost half the of Latino graduates failed to prepare them for either college or career.

Report: Few California Students Ready for College, Career

Like all states, California’s prosperity rests on the strength of its workforce. Yet a new report from The Education Trust–West finds the Golden State’s high schools aren’t preparing students to participate in an economy that increasingly demands a college education. Across the five districts studied, college-readiness rates among high school graduates ranged from 24 to 60 percent. In one illustrative district, the course of study provide to about 30 percent of white high school graduates and almost half the of Latino graduates failed to prepare them for either college or career.

Report: Few California Students Ready for College, Career

Like all states, California’s prosperity rests on the strength of its workforce. Yet a new report from The Education Trust–West finds the Golden State’s high schools aren’t preparing students to participate in an economy that increasingly demands a college education. Across the five districts studied, college-readiness rates among high school graduates ranged from 24 to 60 percent. In one illustrative district, the course of study provide to about 30 percent of white high school graduates and almost half the of Latino graduates failed to prepare them for either college or career.

Report: Few California Students Ready for College, Career

Like all states, California’s prosperity rests on the strength of its workforce. Yet a new report from The Education Trust–West finds the Golden State’s high schools aren’t preparing students to participate in an economy that increasingly demands a college education. Across the five districts studied, college-readiness rates among high school graduates ranged from 24 to 60 percent. In one illustrative district, the course of study provide to about 30 percent of white high school graduates and almost half the of Latino graduates failed to prepare them for either college or career.

Report: Few California Students Ready for College, Career

Like all states, California’s prosperity rests on the strength of its workforce. Yet a new report from The Education Trust–West finds the Golden State’s high schools aren’t preparing students to participate in an economy that increasingly demands a college education. Across the five districts studied, college-readiness rates among high school graduates ranged from 24 to 60 percent. In one illustrative district, the course of study provide to about 30 percent of white high school graduates and almost half the of Latino graduates failed to prepare them for either college or career.

Everyone Loses When Schools Cheat, but Especially Students

The Education Trust knows that when poor children and children of color are given the right instruction and support, they can achieve at high levels. Our organization spends considerable resources to identify schools that are demonstrating this fact by helping their students to succeed. Some we honor with our Dispelling the Myth award because we believe these educators provide vital inspiration and information about the powerful role schools can play in improving the lives of their students.

We Made Noise on Save Pell Day

A broad coalition of social justice, education, and youth groups banded together on July 25, to send a loud message to Washington decision makers: Don’t cut Pell Grants for low-income and working-class students.

On Save Pell Day, student advocates across the country used e-mail and social media to get the attention of policymakers, and to stand up for the nearly 10 million hard-working students who rely on Pell to afford college.

Even though our online day of action is over, there's still time for you to help us win the fight to save Pell. Join the community on Facebook and follow @SavePell on Twitter. You can also check out the Save Pell Tumblr blog to track the latest news on the campaign.

Gaps Narrow in Geography, But Scores Remain Low

It’s no wonder GPS devices are a hot seller in the U.S. gadget market. Many Americans are simply incapable of reading a map. New data from the National Assessment of Educational Progress on how public school students perform on geography show mixed results. Between 1994 and 2010, the scores of African-American and Latino fourth-graders skyrocketed — by 27 and 21 points, respectively. In both fourth and eighth grades, the gaps between students of color and their white counterparts narrowed between 2001 and 2010.

But some of the news is troubling.