The Education Trust-West works for the high academic achievement of all students at all levels, pre-k through college.

Achievement Gap

Achievement Gap

Ed Trust–West Releases Statement in Response to Governor Brown’s 2014-2015 State Budget

OAKLAND, CA (June 20, 2014) – Valerie Cuevas, Interim Executive Director of The Education Trust—West, issued the following statement following Governor Brown’s signing of the 2014-2015 state budget today:  

“We commend the Governor and the Legislature for accelerating the implementation of the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) by providing an additional $4.7 billion in the 2014-15 budget. This additional funding will strengthen the work of school districts to serve our neediest students and close achievement gaps. Unfortunately, we remain concerned about two issues. The Governor and the Legislature chose not to designate additional funding for implementation of the Common Core State Standards. All students will be subject to more rigorous state standards and assessments, but not all students will have access to fully prepared teachers, and adequate technology and instructional materials. As a result, opportunity and achievement gaps could be exacerbated rather than narrowed. Furthermore, the plan for increasing employer contributions to the California State Teachers Retirement System (CalSTRS) will double the cost of retirement benefits for school districts without a plan for funding the increased contributions. Without a plan for additional funding, the increased contributions to CalSTRS will be paid at the expense of funding for the LCFF, including supplemental and concentration funding for needy students.”

Learning from District Success:Promising Practices from The Education Trust–West’s District Report Cards

Learning from District Success:
Promising Practices from The Education Trust–West’s District Report Cards

 

April 30, 2014

Dr. Jeannette LaFors, Director of Equity Initiatives, The Education Trust-West
Leni Wolf, Data & Policy Analyst, The Education Trust-West  

To watch a video recording of the webinar, click here

 

Presented: 
April 30 2014

The Education Trust-West 2014 Policy Agenda

The past several years have jolted California’s education system like never before. Seismic shifts in school finance, standards, curriculum, and instruction sent shockwaves through our state’s education policy landscape. Long-familiar landmarks in school finance, accountability, and assessment were replaced by a host of new initiatives, including the Local Control Funding Formula, the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium, Common Core State Standards, and Next Generation Science Standards. In the coming years, as they ripple through our education system, these new initiatives have the potential to shift California’s focus more towards equity and close our state’s achievement and opportunity gaps. But we also know that without close attention to equitable implementation, these initiatives could widen existing gaps and create new fissures between our highest need students and their more advantaged peers. In our 2014 Policy Agenda, we recommend steps that policymakers should take in four core policy areas to ensure that students of color, low-income students, and English learners benefit from the changes in our education landscape.

Publication date: 
February 14 2014

Bridging the Technology Divide: Equitable Access to Robust Infrastructure and Digital Content for All

The Education Trust-West’s “Bringing Equity to the Common Core” Webinar Series
Bridging the Technology Divide: Equitable Access to Robust Infrastructure and Digital Content for All

January 30, 2014


Jeannette LaFors, Director of Equity Initiatives, The Education Trust-West
Amber Banks, Practice Associate, The Education Trust-West
Orville Jackson, Senior Research Analyst, The Education Trust-West 

To watch a recording of the Webinar, click here

Presented: 
January 30 2014

Statement & Analysis from The Education Trust–West on California’s 2013 NAEP Reading and Mathematics Results

OAKLAND, CA (November 7) -- Performance for California’s eighth grade students in reading and mathematics has improved since 2011, but fourth grade performance remains flat, according to data released today from the 2013 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). The new data mark the tenth year where all states have participated in NAEP.

Scores for every group of students have been slowly improving over the last decade. Of particular note, California’s Latino students have gained 16 points in eighth-grade reading over the past 10 years, with a 7-point gain since the last assessment in 2011.

Unfortunately, California still ranks near the bottom in fourth-grade reading and math for students overall and for low-income and Latino students. In fact, California’s overall national rankings of 46th or 47th in fourth-grade reading and math have not budged since the assessment was last given in 2011.

Even more troubling, stubborn achievement gaps persist. While the gaps between Latino and African-American students and their white peers and the gaps between low-income and higher income students have slightly narrowed over the last decade, there are still yawning divides between these groups of students. For example, in eighth-grade math, only 11 percent of African-American students and 15 percent of Latino students are proficient, while 42 percent of white students are proficient.

The State of Educational Opportunity in California: Commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington

"The State of Educational Opportunity in California: Commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington"

By Arun Ramanathan, Executive Director, The Education Trust-West

Presented: 
August 28 2013

New Ed Trust–West Report Paints a Detailed Portrait of How African-American Youth Fare in Los Angeles County Schools

OAKLAND, CA (February 26, 2013) – Today, The Education Trust–West releases At a Crossroads: A Comprehensive Picture of How African-American Youth Fare in Los Angeles County Schools and accompanying Prezi. Using data from multiple sources, the report finds that academic and socioemotional outcomes for African-American students in L.A. County are poor overall. However, it also identifies school districts where African-American students are doing better on a range of outcomes including academic performance, graduation rates, A-G completion rates, suspension rates, special education identification rates, and health and wellness indicators.  

“One in three African-American students in California attend an L.A. County public school. This report reveals that the vast majority of these students are not receiving the opportunities they need to succeed and to ultimately achieve their college and career dreams,” said Lindsey Stuart, author of the report and a research analyst at The Education Trust–West, a statewide education advocacy organization that works to close gaps in opportunity and achievement for students of color and low-income students. 

At a Crossroads: A Comprehensive Picture of How African-American Youth Fare in L.A. County Schools

Today, The Education Trust–West releases At a Crossroads: A Comprehensive Picture of How African-American Youth Fare in Los Angeles County Schools and accompanying Prezi. Using data from multiple sources, the report finds that academic and socioemotional outcomes for African-American students in L.A. County are poor overall. However, it also identifies school districts where African-American students are doing better on a range of outcomes including academic performance, graduation rates, A-G completion rates, suspension rates, special education identification rates, and health and wellness indicators.  

Publication date: 
February 25 2013

A Community Conversation on African-American Student Outcomes in Los Angeles County

Monday, February 25, 2013 - 9:00am - 11:00am
Location: 
California Community Foundation

Monday, February 25, 2013
9:00-11:00 am
The California Community Foundation
S. Figueroa St. Suite 400 Los Angeles, CA 90012


Please join us for a provocative overview on how Los Angeles County is addressing the barriers to African-American student success. 

The Program

Researchers from The Education Trust—West will share findings of their latest report, a first-of-its-kind assessment of the academic, socio-emotional and health outcomes of African-American youth in L.A. County. A quantitative analysis of data primarily from The Civil Rights Data Collection (CRDC), the California Department of Education (CDE), as well as secondary research, predominantly from the California Healthy Kids Survey seeks to paint a comprehensive portrait of the experience of African-American youth in Los Angeles County schools.

Following the presentation, a panel of community leaders and stakeholders will also discuss the strategies necessary to transform the educational system to better serve African-American youth in the county. 

Achievement in California 2003-2012: A Story of Slow, Incremental Growth and Persistent Achievement Gaps

Achievement in California 2003-2012: A Story of Slow, Incremental Growth and Persistent Achievement Gaps
September 28, 2012
The Education Trust—West

Presented: 
September 28 2012