The Education Trust-West works for the high academic achievement of all students at all levels, pre-k through college.

Publications

Publications

The One Billion Dollar Question: How Can Districts and Schools Equitably Implement the Common Core?

With Governor Brown’s announcement of an unprecedented $1.25 billion dollars to accelerate Common Core implementation, the Education Trust—West releases a new brief, The One Billion Dollar Question: How Can Districts and Schools Equitably Implement the Common Core? The brief is designed to be an easy-to-use primer for district, charter, county, and community leaders to assess local Common Core implementation efforts based on best practices nationally and in California.

Publication date: 
August 5 2013

Local Control Funding Formula

"Local Control Funding Formula"

By Melissa San Miguel, External Relations Associate, The Education Trust-West 

Presented: 
July 30 2013

The Future of Science Education in California: The Promise of the Next Generation of Science Standards for Students and Communities

Later this year, California policymakers will decide whether to adopt a new set of science standards, called the Next Generation Science Standards, or NGSS. The NGSS not only reflect the major advances in science of the last two decades, they also focus strongly on teaching students the practices that scientists and engineers use to apply the knowledge of science to solving real-world problems. The standards promise to deepen students’ conceptual understanding, critical thinking, and communication skills. The resulting rigorous science education will allow every student to graduate from high school better prepared to successfully negotiate the rigors of college and 21st century careers. The promise of the NGSS will only be realized if California’s leaders make the decision to adopt them. We urge you to express your support. For more about these standards and how you can be involved, please see our latest report, The Future of Science Education in California: The Promise of the Next Generation Science Standards for Students and Communities, which we have produced in collaboration with our partners: The California STEM Learning Network and Children Now.

Publication date: 
June 7 2013

Learning from District Success:Promising Practices from The Education Trust – West’s District Report Cards

"Learning from District Success: Promising Practices from Education Trust-West's District Report Cards"

By Jeannette LaFors, Director of Equity Initiatives, The Education Trust-West;
Lindsey Stuart, Data and Policy Analyst, The Education Trust-West 

Webinar
April 11, 2013

Presented: 
April 11 2013

Cost of Opportunity

The Cost of Opportunity:
Access to College Financial Aid in California
By Orville Jackson
Webinar
Tuesday, March 26, 2013
 

 

Presented: 
March 26 2013

Expanding Access, Creating Options: How Linked Learning Pathways Can Mitigate Barriers to College and Career Access in Schools and Districts

As the Linked Learning high school reform initiative expands across California, the results of a two-year study by the Education Trust–West identifies promising practices in Linked Learning schools and districts. However, the study also notes variation in districtwide implementation of these best practices. The results of the study can be found in the new report released today titled, Expanding Access, Creating Options: How Linked Learning Pathways Can Mitigate Barriers to College and Career Access in Schools and Districts.

Publication date: 
March 21 2013

The Cost of Opportunity: Access to College Financial Aid in California

An analysis of newly available FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) and Cal Grant application data by The Education Trust–West finds that low-income California students may be missing out on potentially hundreds of millions of student aid dollars. The Education Trust–West calculated FAFSA completion rates and Cal Grant completion and award rates both statewide and for individual California high schools. The findings are presented in the newly released report, The Cost of Opportunity: Access to College Financial Aid in California and related website, financialaid.edtrustwest.org. The data reveal that only 54 percent of high school seniors in California’s public high schools completed the FAFSA in the 2012-13 financial aid year. Only 50 percent of seniors completed the Cal Grant application. 

Publication date: 
February 28 2013

At a Crossroads: A Comprehensive Picture of How African-American Youth Fare in L.A. County Schools

Today, The Education Trust–West releases At a Crossroads: A Comprehensive Picture of How African-American Youth Fare in Los Angeles County Schools and accompanying Prezi. Using data from multiple sources, the report finds that academic and socioemotional outcomes for African-American students in L.A. County are poor overall. However, it also identifies school districts where African-American students are doing better on a range of outcomes including academic performance, graduation rates, A-G completion rates, suspension rates, special education identification rates, and health and wellness indicators.  

Publication date: 
February 25 2013

The Education Trust-West 2013 Policy Agenda

The year 2013 jolted California’s education system. Seismic shifts in school finance, standards, curriculum, and instruction sent shockwaves through our state’s education policy landscape.Long-familiar landmarks such as revenue limits, categorical programs, and STAR assessments were replaced by a host of new initiatives with acronyms that Californians are starting to become familiar with, including the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF), the Smarter Balanced Assessments Consortium (SBAC), the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), and the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). In advance of the release of our 2014 Policy Agenda later this month, our 2013 Policy Agenda is available here for you to review. Many of these new initiatives fall into areas we have already been working in. The changes that were made have the potential to shift California’s education landscape towards equity and to help close our state’s achievement and opportunity gaps; however, we also know that without close attention to equitable implementation, these initiatives could widen existing gaps and create fissures between our highest need students and their more advantaged peers.

Publication date: 
February 21 2013

Catching up to the Core: Common Sense Strategies for Accelerating Access to the Common Core in California

The new Education Trust—West report, Catching up to the Core: Common Sense Strategies for Accelerating Access to the Common Core in California, finds that California has fallen far behind other states, and even some local school districts, in implementing the new English-language arts and math Common Core State Standards. This lack of progress only two years before new assessments aligned with the new standards are expected to come online will leave millions of California students trailing their peers in other states. The report profiles best practices used in implementing the CCSS in forward-looking states and school districts, including some in California. It highlights promising work in teacher professional development, instructional materials, technology, and alignment with systems of higher education, particularly in teacher preparation. The report concludes with common sense recommendations for California policymakers. These include improving public understanding of the Common Core, expanding educator professional development, aligning instructional materials, and addressing technology infrastructure and capacity needs.

Publication date: 
December 10 2012